kwakersaur mia

Invites went out to all who were members before. I got email bounces from Lorcan and from Twyla. responses from Crystal, Marjorie and Larry. Silence from the rest. Larry, Crystal and Kwakersaur (me)(David) all elected to rejoin.

Larry and Crystal now have administrative rights — which gives you the power to delete other people’s posts. As Spidey used to say, with great power coems great responsibility. I’ve actually never had to use the delete key — unless you consider comments designed to take us to pay sites.

I will be places without computer access until at least August 12th. In the meantime. Folks could consider next steps here.

See y’all in a week.

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6 responses

  1. I ahd a thought about how we could procede … don’t know if it’s a good thought or a bad one. If we want to keep reading the Bible, maybe we could follow the (Protestant and Catholic) lectionary. That usually has a number of readings for any given day from both the Old and New Testament. That would give us some structure but also some cjoice, and maybe we could do that once a week or every other week, and something else the other times? Just a thought.

  2. Revised Common Lectionary at Vanderbilt University: http://divinity.lib.vanderbilt.edu/lectionary/

  3. I haven’t seen much on Quaker-L lately, aside from things I wrote, largely on subjects I started. One member encouraged me to join a less-liberal Quaker list (where I probably don’t belong) for discussions of the Bible (something I do find nourishing) and I haven’t seen much there, either. Have we separated out into groups that are too homogenous, so that no-one stays anyplace where the others are sufficiently different to have anything to say to one another?I’d suggest choosing one “book” and sticking to it–bringing in related material from elsewhere, but starting one thing from the top, continuing until done, then going on.I haven’t read your archives, although I may be interested in joining, if you’ll have me. I’m a poet. I mean I have that gift and that duty, which sometimes makes me playful and other times rouses me out of bed with gurgling mind and body to finish some piece that’s just been given me. (& afterwards I may need to edit. Inspiration is not infallibility, alas!)What books haven’t you done yet?

  4. Welcome! I suggest you participate by joining in — commenting on stuff befroe joining. When you fell up to it — ask and we’ll add you to the roster.We started with James, moved on to the gospel of John, Gospel of Thomas, dabbled here and there on favourite passages, a smattering of psalms and teh the book of Acts. Personally I think we have done a lot of book studies and would prefers omething like the lectionary as Crystal suggested or doing a thematic study — parables, or healings, or something.

  5. The trouble with a lectionary is that it comes with an agenda. I know, so does every one of those booklets in the Bible, but having your noses close to the ground might help keep you from being dragged off the trail. If you insist on a lectionary, the Jewish schedule (with digressions to how it connects to Christian scriptures) would be my preference. Or how about one of the synoptics, branching to comparisons with other synoptics and the Hebrew Scriptures? Your study, your choice–but this one gets you examining 1) the way Christian writers hijacked some passages a little arbitrarily, & conversely2) how much extra meaning shows up when you look at passages that would have been basic familiar stuff to Jesus’ audience but which we don’t otherwise take into account.

  6. The agendas of lectionaries are in the synoptic reading — which gospel did they lay long side of which epistle — and so forth. That’s an agenda close enough to the surface to be relatively safe — compared to the complex and mostly hidden agendas in Matthew or Luke.I seriously agree. Depth sort of calls for a book study. We’ve also done a lot of that here. And at this point energy and interest levels trump ideological commitments to inductive book studies.If we do a book study — I would prefer an epistle to a gospel. Again — personal preference.

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