Jesus Always in Control

If Jesus had the sort of superhuman command of the events leading to his death that John wants him to have — then it wasn’t a real death was it?

In death we lose the last pretence of controlling our lives. It is humiliation. Its is a stripping away of the last bits of who we are or try to be in this world.

By painting a Jesus with this much command John has given us a Jesus who is not human and who really could not have tasted death. The death becomes irrelevant in a way.

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4 responses

  1. Hi David.I agree … before I was a christian, I used to think of Jesus that way – 100 % divine and with the emotional affect of a sock puppet. Who could have a relationship with that kind of God?

  2. David, you’ve defined death in a rather limited way. I’ve known dying people who consciously gave up nothing, but joyfully looked forward to the glorious beyond.But my relationship with Christ is not based on a human or god like death, but rather on a very human life.Crystal, Father Overberg’s Incarnational theology seems to make the manner of Jesus’ death less critical.

  3. But my relationship with Christ is not based on a human or god like death, but rather on a very human life.Thsi I guess was my point. This gospel tries so very hard to discern the God shining through the human life that the life starts to look a little less human to me.

  4. “tries so very hard …”: exactly the reason I’m more comfortable with a low christology.

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